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The UAE's Role in Sudan's Conflict and South Sudan’s Economic Woes

The UAE's Role in Sudan's Conflict and South Sudan’s Economic Woes

A report by the United Nations Panel of Experts on Darfur under Security Council Resolution 1591 uncovered compelling evidence of the UAE's support for the RSF. This support includes using Chad's Um Jaras (Amdjarass) airport as a military supply hub for RSF weapons, in violation of UN arms embargoes on Darfur.

In recent years, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) has emerged as a key player in the complex web of conflicts engulfing Sudan and South Sudan. However, far from being a force for peace and stability, the UAE's actions have exacerbated tensions and hindered the prospects of lasting peace in the region.

Support for Militias and Violation of UN Resolutions

One of the most troubling aspects of the UAE's involvement in Sudan is its support for the Rapid Support Forces (RSF), a militia group accused of human rights abuses and war crimes. A report by the United Nations Panel of Experts on Darfur under Security Council Resolution 1591 uncovered compelling evidence of the UAE's support for the RSF. This support includes using Chad's Um Jaras (Amdjarass) airport as a military supply hub for RSF weapons, in violation of UN arms embargoes on Darfur.

Furthermore, the UAE has gone beyond military support to actively promoting the RSF politically and economically. This includes providing political sanctuary and safe haven for RSF leaders, facilitating their movement across the region, and promoting them through media influence. The UAE's actions not only undermine international efforts for peace but also contribute to the perpetuation of conflict and instability in Sudan.

Economic Exploitation and Debt Traps in South Sudan

In South Sudan, the UAE has engaged in unjust economic exploitation. Through opaque agreements and questionable loans, the UAE has sought to economically strangle South Sudan. One such deal involves a $12 billion loan to South Sudan, to be repaid through shipments of oil at below-market prices. This agreement, signed through a company linked to a member of the Emirati royal family, raises serious concerns about transparency and fairness.

Moreover, the terms of these agreements disproportionately benefit the UAE, redirecting significant portions of South Sudanese resources to UAE-controlled infrastructure projects. This not only deepens economic dependence but also hampers the ability of South Sudan to manage its own affairs and pursue sustainable development.

A Call for Withdrawal

The UAE's actions in Sudan and South Sudan are deeply concerning and undermine efforts for peace, stability, and self-determination in the region. By supporting militias, violating UN resolutions, and engaging in exploitative economic practices, the UAE is prolonging conflict and hindering the prospects of a peaceful resolution.

It is imperative that the UAE reevaluates its approach and withdraws its support for destabilizing actions in Sudan and South Sudan. This includes respecting UN resolutions, ending support for the Rapid Support Forces and engaging in transparent, fair economic practices that prioritize the well-being and sovereignty of Sudanese and South Sudanese people.

In conclusion, the UAE's interference in Sudan and South Sudan is a hindrance to peace and stability in the region. It's time for the UAE to recognize the harm its actions are causing and take concrete steps towards disengagement and de-escalation. Sudan and South Sudan deserve the chance to pursue peace and development without external interference and exploitation.

If the UAE doesn’t cease its exploitative interference in Sudan and South Sudan, the African Union should look beyond its wealth and declare it as a hostile entity to Africa. If the African Union doesn’t do this, then more than 1 billion Africans will seriously question if this continental body is truly committed to the wellbeing of Africans.
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